Includes taxa from following child checklists:
Authors: Matthew J. Peters
Citation: Peters, Matthew J. 2022. The Flora of Lime Pond Preserve, Columbia, New Hampshire: Online Annotated Checklist. Hosted by the Consortium of Northeastern Herbaria.

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Families: 78
Genera: 240
Species: 437
Total Taxa (details): 440
(balsam fir), C, Widespread in upland forests, especially areas with more recent logging, occasional to frequent in cedar wetlands.
(box-elder), R, A few saplings along hayfield edge and in young forest adjacent the NE corner of the hayfield.
(striped maple), C, Widespread in upland forests, especially areas with more recent logging, occasional in cedar swamps.
(red maple), C, Widespread in upland forests, especially areas with more recent logging, occasional in cedar swamps, less abundant in rich mesic forest.
(sugar maple), C, Widespread, forming nearly pure stands in rich woods; common elsewhere throughout the upland forests.
(mountain maple), C, Widespread in upland forests, especially on rocky slopes, also abundant on hummocks in cedar wetlands., source: COLL.; David Edward Boufford 2648 [Keene State College]
(yarrow), O, Hayfield and disturbed areas.
(sweet-flag), R, Cattail marsh at north end of pond.
(white baneberry, dolls-eyes), O, Upland forests, often in areas of enrichment., source: COLL.; David Edward Boufford 2636 [Keene State College]
(red baneberry), R?, Noted in typic upland forest near the parking area and previously reported by Ward from hill SW of pond in semi-rich forest, seemingly much less frequent than A. pachypoda.
(northern maidenhair), O, Patchy in the rich mesic forest.
(bishop's weed, goutweed), R, Isolated colony spreading (not cultivated) at dilapidated camp inholding NE of pond, technically not within the preserve, but surrounded by it.
(white snakeroot) [Eupatorium rugosum], R?, Noted once along trail paralleling outlet stream, perhaps overlooked on rocky southern slopes.
(common agrimony), O, Most frequent along trails and field edges, sporadic elsewhere in uplands and swamp margins., source: COLL.; A. H. Moore 3843 [Harvard University], A. S. Pease 10466 [Harvard University]
(roadside agrimony), O, Most frequent along trails and field edges, sporadic elsewhere in uplands and swamp margins., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 12700 [University of New Hampshire]
(colonial bent), O, Hayfield and trail margins.
(ticklegrass), O, Pond shore marshes, fens, moist disturbed areas, especially seasonally exposed shorelines.
(wild leek), R, Over 1,000 plants in about 5 small, concentrated patches in rich mesic forest, some being overrun by Mycelis muralis., source: COLL. S3 Watch List; Matthew J. Peters 21-15 [Consortium of Northeastern Herbaria]
(gray alder), O, Pond shore , alder seepage thicket, and sparsely in fens.
(common shadbush), R?, Noted at edge of disturbed seepage forest NE of the hayfield, though likely overlooked elsewhere.
(pearly everlasting), R, Along trails and disturbed openings.
(sweet vernal grass), O/F, Hayfield and disturbed areas.
(spreading dogbane), O, Field margins.
(garden columbine), H, Known only from a 1917 Pease collection that states 'Escaped in two stations near Lime Pond'., source: COLL.; A. S. Pease... 16621 [Harvard University]
(wild sarsaparilla), C, Upland woods and cedar swamps.
(spikenard), O, Mainly in enriched upland forests and sporadic along trails.
(great burdock), O, Field and trail margins and disturbed openings in upland forests.
(Jack-in-the-pulpit), F, Cedar swamps and moist upland forest., source: COLL.; David Edward Boufford 2630 [Keene State College]
(black chokeberry), R, Known only from a single leaf collected by Sperduto (as Rhamnus alnifolia) from outlet stream fen. Perhaps overlooked in pond shore thickets as well.
(common milkweed), O, Field edges.
(northern lady fern), C, In wet- mesic forest areas, moist draws, swamps, and seepage forests.
(winter cress), H, Known only from a 1971 Boufford collection from 'grassy clearing near Lime Pd'. Likely overlooked in this study., source: COLL.
(yellow birch), C, Widespread in upland forests, less frequently on hummocks in swamps and fens where it is often of shorter stature.
(paper birch), C, Widespread in upland forests, especially areas with more recent logging, and infrequently on hummocks in swamps and fens, where it is often of shorter stature., source: COLL.; A. H. Moore 3874 [Harvard University], A. S. Pease 10489 [Harvard University]
(gray birch), F, Widespread in upland forests, especially in areas with more recent logging history, and less frequently on hummocks in swamps, seepage forests and fens, where it is often of limited stature.
(nodding bur-marigold), O, Pond shore marshes and vernal pool., source: COLL.; A. S. Pease 29680 [Harvard University]
(purple-stemmed beggar-ticks), O, Pond shore marshes and outlet stream fen.
(daisy-leaf moonwort), R, Very few plants in upland woods.
(leathery grapefern), H, Known only from a 1917 Pease collection (as B. ternatum var. intermedium) from 'woods near Lime Pond'., source: COLL.; A. S. Pease 16588 [Harvard University]
(swamp moonwort) [subsumed in B. simplex], R, A cluster of 5 tiny plants in a cedar swamp in NW corner of Preserve., source: SU Indeterminate
(bearded shorthusk), O, Sporadic in upland forests.
(fringed brome), O, Sparsely in fens and cedar wetlands, and sporadic in moist uplands.
(smooth brome), C, Hayfield.
(Canada bluejoint), O, Pond shores and sparsely in fens., source: COLL.; A. S. Pease 14000 [Harvard University]
(wild calla), O, Pond shore marshes and fens.
(water starwort), R, Pond shore marshes, on seasonally exposed muck.
(marsh-marigold), F, Pond shore marshes, fens, alder seepage thicket, seepage forest and cedar swamp hollows.
(calypso), H, Last observed in 1981. Photographically vouchered in 1931 by Wallace, later (1946) collected from 'cedar woods NE side of Lime Pond' by Pease., source: COLL. SH Endangered; T. W. Wallace 1931-05-23 [University of New Hampshire], A. S. Pease 31,887 [Harvard University]
(hedge bindweed), O, Hayfield, especially around scattered apple trees and shrubby patches.
(common toothwort) [Dentaria diphylla], O/F, Seepage areas and moist draws, especially in rich and semi-rich forest., source: COLL.; G. E. Crow 2544 [University of New Hampshire]
(common bitter cress), O, Swamps, seeps, and fens.
(Appalachian sedge), R, Upland forests, often on convex mounds or near tree bases, mainly in areas with some enrichment.
(prickly bog sedge) [Carex howei], H, Known only from a single 1963 collection (as C. howei) by Hodgdon and Rhoades from a 'moist swale near Lime Pond'., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 12675 [University of New Hampshire]
(Baileys sedge), R, First collected by Bailey in 2007 from disturbed open area around groundwater monitoring well 14B in cedar seepage forest north of the pond, not refound there, but a single mature clump found in similar setting near monitoring well 18 &18B about 300ft away., source: COLL. S2 Threatened; Matthew J. Peters 21-90b [Consortium of Northeastern Herbaria]
(Bebbs sedge), R/O, Pond shore marshes and fens, disturbed openings in cedar seepage forests, perhaps a few hundred plants total, widely scattered., source: COLL. S3 Watch List; Matthew J. Peters 20-28 [Consortium of Northeastern Herbaria]
(woodland sedge), O/F, Upland forests and less frequently in cedar swamps.
(brownish sedge), R?, In cedar seepage forest near the alder seepage thicket.
(Buxbaums sedge), R, Eight small patches all around the pond shore, usually in organic soil turfs perched atop shoreline rocks. Just 29 total culms observed with 3 patches entirely vegetative. Some plants appeared drought stressed and early senescent in late summer 2020. One of two stations in NH., source: COLL. S1 Endangered; A. R. Hodgdon 12671 [University of New Hampshire], A. H. Moore 3861 [Harvard University], A. S. Pease 10460 [Harvard University]
(silvery sedge), O, Pond shore and sparsely in fens., source: COLL.
(common sedge), F, Upland forests., source: COLL.; G. R. Cooley 8108 [University of New Hampshire]
(Crawfords sedge), R, Hayfield margin, observed once.
(weak sedge), C, Upland forests and less frequently in swamps.
(northern sedge), O, Upland forests and hummocks in cedar seepage forests.
(Deweys sedge), O, Enriched upland forests., source: COLL.
(lesser tussock sedge), R, Pond shore and fens, notably abundant in large rich fen, also a few plants in a marshy section of former cedar swamp impounded by a logging trail., source: COLL. S2 Threatened; Arthur Stanley Pease 10459 [University of Connecticut], A. R. Hodgdon 12676 [University of New Hampshire], A. H. Moore 3853 [Harvard University], A. S. Pease 10459 [Harvard University]
(two-seeded sedge), C, Cedar swamps and wooded portions of fens., source: COLL.; G. E. Crow 2556 [University of New Hampshire], David Edward Boufford 1971-06-14 [Keene State College]
(lesser prickly sedge), ?, Reported by Sperduto as a dominant in outlet stream fen (who also noted C. interior at much lower frequency). Perhaps overlooked in the present study amid abundant C. interior.
(yellow sedge), F, Pond shore marshes, especially on the east side, openings in cedar swamps and seepage forests, and fens, especially abundant in large rich fen., source: COLL.; G. R. Cooley 8109 [University of New Hampshire], G. R. Cooley 8109 [University of New Hampshire], A. S. Pease 10469 [University of New Hampshire], A. S. Pease 10469 [Harvard University], more...
(slender sedge), O, Mainly along road margins, trails, and in disturbed upland forests., source: COLL.; G. E. Crow 2547 [University of New Hampshire]
(gynandrous sedge), F, Wetlands, usually with seepage, also moist upland openings and disturbed areas., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 7927 [University of New Hampshire], G. R. Cooley... 8110 [Harvard University]
(porcupine sedge), O, Widely scattered in pond shore marshes, fens, and openings in cedar swamps and seepage forests, likely hundreds of plants in total., source: COLL. S3 Watch List; G. R. Cooley 8111 [University of New Hampshire], Matthew J. Peters 20-27 [Consortium of Northeastern Herbaria]
(swollen sedge), F, Swamps and upland forests.
(lake sedge), R/O, Localized in pond shore marshes., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 12672 [University of New Hampshire]
(loose-flowered sedge), H, Known only from a single 1971 Boufford collection (det. by Standley) from 'rich woods at Lime Pd.' Perhaps overlooked in this study amid abundant C. blanda., source: COLL.; D. E. Boufford 2661 [University of New Hampshire]
(northern woodland sedge), H, Known only from a 1971 Boufford collection from 'rich woods near Lime Pd.' Likely overlooked in the present work., source: COLL.; David Edward Boufford 1971-06-14 [Keene State College]
(New England sedge), O/F, Sporadic in upland forests forming clumps and loose mats.
(pale sedge), O, Hayfield, trail margins, and gaps in disturbed cedar seepage forests., source: COLL.
(Pecks sedge), R, Sparsely but widely scattered, often on convex mounds in rich and semi-rich forest areas, also noted once in a cedar swamp, perhaps most abundant on slopes west of outlet stream., source: COLL. S3 Watch List; Matthew J. Peters 20-1 [Consortium of Northeastern Herbaria], Matthew J. Peters 20-2 [Consortium of Northeastern Herbaria], G. R. Cooley... 8107 [Harvard University]
(peduncled sedge), C, Widespread in moist upland forests, especially where enriched, and abundant in cedar swamps and cedar seepage forests., source: COLL.; G. R. Cooley 8098 [University of New Hampshire]
(plantain-leaved sedge), R, Rich mesic forest and moist toe slopes with localized enrichment., source: COLL.; G. E. Crow 2546 [University of New Hampshire], David Edward Boufford 1971-06-14 [Keene State College]
(beaded broom sedge), R/O, Trail edges, woods, and wetlands, often in areas of disturbance.
(retrorse sedge), R, Alder seepage thicket and cattail marsh at north end of pond, also collected (as C. lupulina) from outlet stream fen by Sperduto in 2007 where noted as <1% cover., source: COLL. D.D. Sperduto 7372 [personal collection]; SU Indeterminate
(rough sedge), F, In areas of seepage.
(stipitate sedge), F, Pond shore marshes and fens, openings in cedar swamps and seepage forests.
(tussock sedge), R, A small colony noted near the north pond shore adjacent to site of recently razed camp, perhaps overlooked elsewhere around the pond.
(three seeded sedge), C, Cedar swamps.
(beaked sedge), O, Pond shore and sparsely in fens.
(greenish sedge), H, Known only from 1907 and 1944 Pease, Moore, and Hodgdon collections from 'marl shore of Lime Pond', with marl visible in roots., source: COLL. SU Indeterminate; A. H. Moore 2856, 3066 [Harvard University], A. S. Pease 10470 [Harvard University]
(blue cohosh), O, Rich and semi-rich forests.
(common mouse-ear chickweed), F, Hayfield and parking area, logging trails, disturbed areas.
(leatherleaf), O, Pond shore and fen on outlet stream.
(fireweed) [Epilobium angustifolium], R, Field edge near parking area.
(turtlehead), O, Fens and cedar swamp openings.
(pipsissewa), R, A few plants in acidic forest near outcrops on a south aspect slope above Fish Pond Road.
(water carpet), F, In areas of enriched seepage.
(bulbiferous water-hemlock), O, Pond shore and fen on outlet stream.
(drooping wood reed), F, Sparsely but widely scattered, wetlands and mesic forest, often on mounds.
(dwarf enchanters nightshade), F, Cedar swamps and seepage wetlands.
(Canada thistle), R, A single patch in a camp access trail near the pond outlet.
(swamp thistle), R, One patch noted in margin of cedar swamp in SE corner of the Preserve.
(bull thistle), R, Disturbed area around recently razed camp at north end of pond.
(common spring beauty), F, Abundant but patchy over large swaths of upland forest.
(virgins-bower), R, Road edge in moist disturbed woods.
(wild basil) [Satureja vulgaris], O, Trail edges, fields, and disturbed areas, sporadic in openings in cedar wetlands.
(bluebead lily), C, Upland forests, often in less enriched areas with conifers, and hummocks in cedar wetlands., source: COLL.; David Edward Boufford 1971-06-14 [Keene State College]
(long-bracted green orchid), R, Three depauperate and vegetative plants on rich mesic forest hilltop SE of pond, previously collected in the Lime Pond vicinity in 1917 and 1978., source: COLL. S3 Watch List; F. Brackley 4013 [University of New Hampshire], M. L. Fernald... 16587 [Harvard University]
(goldthread), F, Upland forest with conifers and hummocks in cedar swamps.
(alternate-leaved dogwood) [Swida alternifolia], F, Mainly in upland forests, especially with enrichment, and less frequently in swamps and seepage forests., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 12715 [University of New Hampshire]
(bunchberry) [Chamaepericlymenum canadense], C, Upland forests, especially less enriched areas with conifers, and on hummocks in cedar wetlands., source: COLL.; David Edward Boufford 2632 [Keene State College]
(red-osier dogwood), O, Fens and openings in cedar swamps and seepage forests
(beaked hazelnut), F, Widespread, though rarely dense, in upland forests, less frequently in cedar swamps and seepage forests.
(hawthorn), R, A few small vegetative shrubs in field edges, not identifiable to species, but not the common C. punctata.
(moccasin flower), O, Sparsely scattered in upland forests, mainly in less enriched areas, white flowered forms are prevalent., source: COLL.; D.E. Boufford 2638 [SEINet], David Edward Boufford 2638 [Keene State College]
(bulblet bladder fern), O, Abundant in about 10 substantial patches in cedar swamps and cedar seepage forests, mainly south and east of the pond, but historically collected near the northwest pond shore and also reported by Ward from cedar wetlands north of the pond; many hundreds to thousands of plants in total., source: COLL.; A. S. Pease 1933-08-26 [University of Massachusetts, Amherst], Matthew J. Peters 20-95 [Consortium of Northeastern Herbaria], A. S. Pease 10451 [Harvard University]
(slender fragile fern), R, Near tree bases and small bare soil areas on mounds and steep slopes in rich mesic forest, rarely also on a few outcrops., source: COLL.; G. E. Crow 2550 [University of New Hampshire], A. H. Moore 3920 [Harvard University], A. S. Pease 10479 [Harvard University]
(orchard grass), C, Hayfield, trail margins.
(flat-stemmed oat-grass), F, Mainly in logging trails and other disturbed sites.
(poverty oat-grass), O, Dry areas in hayfield, along logging roads, and other disturbed areas, including tip up mounds, also sparsely on dry emergent rocks along the pond shore., source: COLL.; A. H. Moore 3871 [Harvard University], A. S. Pease 10440 [Harvard University]
(prickly tree clubmoss) [Lycopodium d.], C, Upland woods.
(hay-scented fern), C, Upland woods, forming dense, near-monocultural colonies in places, including parts of the old sugarbush in rich mesic forest.
(squirrel corn), R, Small patch in rich mesic forest next to foundation of razed sugarhouse, also previously reported from semi-rich hill W of pond., source: COLL. S3 Watch List; G. E. Crow 2548 [University of New Hampshire]
(Dutchmans-breeches), R, Scattered In semi-rich hill W of pond near old sugaring equipment remnants.
(intricate panic grass) [Panicum lanuginosum], O, Trail edges and disturbed areas.
(northern panic grass) [Panicum b.], O, Disturbed openings and trail margins, also noted at fen margin., source: COLL.; A. S. Pease 13976 [Harvard University]
(dwarf bush-honeysuckle), O, Noted on banks along trails, perhaps overlooked on rocky south slopes above Fish Pond Rd., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 12738 [University of New Hampshire]
(smooth crabgrass), O, In bare soil of parking area and road through hayfield.
(northern running-pine) [Lycopodium c.], H, Known only from a 1907 Pease specimen from 'Dry woods north of Lime Pond'. Perhaps overlooked amid D. digitatum in the present study., source: COLL.; A. S. Pease 11081 [Harvard University]
(southern running-pine) [Lycopodium d.], F, Upland forests., source: COLL.; G. E. Crow 8350 [University of New Hampshire]
(tall white aster) [Aster umbellatus], F, Moist field and trail margins, disturbed woods, and less frequently in cedar wetlands and pond shores.
(common sundew), O, Pond shore marshes and fens, often on hummocks or emergent rocks and logs in moss mats., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 4844 [University of New Hampshire]
(mountain woodfern), O, Cedar swamps and adjacent moist, coniferous upland forests.
(spinulose woodfern) [D. spinulosa], O, Swamps and adjacent moist, coniferous upland forests.
(crested woodfern), O, Cedar swamps, seepage forests and fens., source: COLL.; David Edward Boufford 2633 [Keene State College]
(Goldies fern), R, Five plants reported by Sperduto in 1999 from base of slope at swamp edge east of pond. Not refound in this study despite multiple searches., source: COLL. D.D. Sperduto 7300 [personal collection]; S3 Watch List
(intermediate woodfern), C, Upland woods and less frequent in cedar swamps., source: COLL.; David Edward Boufford 2649 [Keene State College]
(marginal woodfern), O, Upland forests, especially on slopes and rockier areas.
(three-way sedge), O, Pond shore marshes and fens.
(matted spike-rush), R, Pond shore marshes, on seasonally exposed organic and mineral muck, especially at north end of pond adjacent the cattail marsh. Over 100 plants observed in unusually dry (low water) season of 2020., source: COLL. S1 Endangered; S. B. Krochmal 1590 [University of New Hampshire], Matthew J. Peters 20-36 [Consortium of Northeastern Herbaria], Matthew J. Peters 20-96 [Consortium of Northeastern Herbaria]
(blunt spike-rush), R, In disturbed moist swale in trail near recently razed 'Moran camp' at north end of pond, perhaps also to be expected on exposed pond shores.
(ovate spike-rush), R, Pond shore marshes, on seasonally exposed organic and mineral muck, especially atnorth end of pond adjacent the cattail marsh. Only 6 plants observed., source: COLL. S1 Endangered; Matthew J. Peters 20-97 [Consortium of Northeastern Herbaria]
(few-flowered spike-rush), H, Known only from a 1917 collection by Pease and Fernald from the pond shore, white marl visible in the specimen's roots., source: COLL. S1 Endangered; M. L. Fernald... 16823 [Harvard University]
(witch grass) [Agropyron repens], C, Hayfield.
(beech-drops), R, Upland forests with beech (host), noted particularly on slopes above Fish Pond Road.
(ciliate willow-herb), O, Areas of seepage and moist soils including swamp margins and seepage forests.
(cinnamon willow-herb), O, Areas of seepage and moist soils including swamp margins and seepage forests.
(narrow-leaved willow-herb), R, In flooded section of cedar swamp impounded by a logging trail. Previously reported by Sperduto from fen on outlet stream, also known from an 1855 William Boott collection originally determined as E. palustre and later (1979) annotated by Peter Hoch to the present species., source: COLL.; W. Boott 1855-09-16 [Harvard University]
(marsh willow-herb), H, Known only from a 1933 Pease specimen from a 'peat bog near Lime Pond', thus not unequivocally known from the Preserve., source: COLL.; A. S. Pease 23878 [Harvard University]
(downy willow-herb), O, Fens and cedar swamp openings., source: COLL.; A. S. Pease 13979 [Harvard University]
(helleborine), F, Upland forests, often near trails, and occasional in forested wetlands., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 12682 [University of New Hampshire]
(field horsetail), F, Mainly in wetlands., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 12653 [University of New Hampshire]
(dwarf scouring-rush), R, Four colonies known in widely disparate seepage forest wetlands., source: COLL. S3 Watch List; Matthew J. Peters 20-25 [Consortium of Northeastern Herbaria]
(woodland horsetail), R, In moist logging trail and adjacent flooded cedar swamp., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 12654 [University of New Hampshire]
(variegated scouring-rush), R, One large colony in disturbed trail opening near groundwater monitoring wells in cedar seepage forest north of the pond, recent?, source: COLL. S3 Watch List; Matthew J. Peters 20-3 [Consortium of Northeastern Herbaria]
(white daisy-fleabane), R, Road edge in moist disturbed woods.
(Philadelphia fleabane), O, Trail margins and other disturbed areas.
(Robins-plantain), O, Trail margins and other disturbed areas.
(daisy fleabane), O, Hayfield, parking area, and logging trails.
(green-keeled cotton-grass), R, A few plants in fens and a cedar swamp opening. Pease (1964) cites a 1907 collection by A.H. Moore (3867), but it has not been found., source: COLL.?
(trout lily), C, Patchy in upland forests.
(boneset), O, Pond shore marshes and fens.
(eyebright), R, Dozens of plants in disturbed area at recently razed camp at north end of pond., source: COLL. SU Indeterminate; Matthew J. Peters 21-92c [Consortium of Northeastern Herbaria]
(large-leaved aster) [Aster macrophyllus], O, Sparsely scattered in upland forests.
(grass-leaved goldenrod), F, Field and trail edges and other disturbed openings, less frequently in wetlands.
(common Joe-Pye weed) [Eupatorium m.], F, Fens, pond shore, and cedar swamp openings.
(American beech), F, Widespread in upland forests but rarely highly abundant.
(creeping red fescue), F, Hayfield, parking area, and disturbed openings.
(wood strawberry), H, Known only from a 1954 collection by Hodgdon and Rich from 'Along Sims Stream: rocky shaded banks beneath sugar maple and fir', thus not clearly known from the preserve, but likely present and overlooked in this study., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 7881 [University of New Hampshire]
(wild strawberry), F, Field and trail edges and other disturbed openings, less frequently in cedar wetlands., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 7880 [University of New Hampshire], A. R. Hodgdon 7884 [University of New Hampshire], David Edward Boufford 2645 [Keene State College]
(white ash), F, Upland forests, also sporadic in swamps as saplings.
(black ash), O, Scattered in enriched swamps and seepage forests, often with cedar.
(small-flowered hemp-nettle), O, Moist disturbed areas, including disturbed cedar seepage forests and rich mesic forest, often intermixed with G. tetrahit.
(dead hemp-nettle), O, Moist disturbed areas, including disturbed cedar seepage forests and rich mesic forest, often intermixed with G. bifida.
(common bedstraw), C, Hayfield and disturbed areas, including rarely in disturbed wetland openings.
(marsh bedstraw), R, Noted a disturbed trail opening in cedar seepage forest, perhaps overlooked elsewhere.
(northern three-lobed bedstraw), O, Pond shore marshes and fens., source: COLL.; M. L. Fernald... 16817 [Harvard University]
(sweet-scented bedstraw), F, Cedar swamps and seepage forests, rich and semi-rich forests.
(creeping snowberry), F, Cedar swamp and seepage forest hummocks.
(herb robert), R?, Reported by Hoy from rich mesic forest.
(yellow avens), O, Trail margins and other disturbed areas.
(white avens), O, Along road margins and trails, especially in young forest adjacent the NE corner of hayfield.
(large-leaved avens), H, Known only from a 1971 Boufford specimen from 'grassy clearing on So. side of Lime Pd.', but likely more widespread and overlooked in this study., source: COLL.; David Edward Boufford 2631 [Keene State College]
(purple avens), O, Seepage areas in various wetland types including cedar swamps and seepage forests, especially in openings.
(rattlesnake grass), R?, Reported by Ward from fen on outlet stream, but not noted there (or elsewhere) by Sperduto or this study, perhaps overlooked.
(fowl manna grass), F, Seepage wetlands and moist disturbed areas.
(lesser rattlesnake-plantain), R/O, Scattered sparsely in upland forest, usually in more coniferous areas, also cedar swamps., source: COLL.; A. S. Pease 23879 [Harvard University]
(checkered rattlesnake-plantain), R/O, Scattered sparsely in upland forest, usually in more coniferous areas., source: COLL.; G. R. Cooley... 8102 [Harvard University]
(oak fern), C, Upland forests and wetlands, perhaps most abundant in cedar swamps and seepage forests. A 1971 Boufford specimen originally determined as G. disjuncta was later annotated to this species by the collector., source: COLL.; David Edward Boufford 2625 [Keene State College]
(panicled hawkweed), O, Upland forests, including rich mesic forest.
(rough hawkweed), O, Upland forests, especially along trails and in disturbed openings.
(shining firmoss), F, Upland woods, less frequently in cedar swamps.
(marsh pennywort), R/O, Seeps and seepy margins of swamps.
(northern St. Johns-wort), R?, Reported by Sperduto as common (1-5% cover) in outlet stream fen, though only H. ellipticum noted there in this study, perhaps overlooked.
(Canada St. Johns-wort), R, In disturbed swale in trail near recently razed 'Moran camp' at north end of pond, possibly overlooked along pond shore.
(pale St. Johns-wort), R?, Noted sparsely in fen along outlet stream, possibly overlooked along pond shore.
(dwarf St. Johns-wort), R?, In disturbed swale in trail near recently razed 'Moran camp' at north end of pond, possibly overlooked along pond shore.
(mountain holly) [Nemopanthus mucronatus], O, Cedar swamps.
(common jewelweed), C, Seeps and seepage areas of swamps, fens and pond shore.
(blue flag), O, Pond shore marshes, fens, and openings in cedar swamps.
(narrow-panicled rush), R, In marshy, flooded section of cedar swamp impounded by a logging trail.
(Dudleys rush), H, Known only from a 1907 Pease specimen from the 'wet marly edge of Lime Pond', perhaps overlooked in this study., source: COLL.; A. S. Pease 10461 [Harvard University]
(soft rush), R, In wet trail through cedar seepage forest and in marshy, flooded section of cedar swamp impounded by a logging trail.
(grass-leaved rush), R, In disturbed area near recently razed 'Moran camp' at north end of pond
(knotted rush), R, Small amounts on an emergent rock along pond shore and in flooded section of cedar swamp, also historically collected from pond shore., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 12681 [University of New Hampshire], A. S. Pease 10448 [Harvard University]
(path rush), O, Trails and disturbed sites.
(tall wild lettuce), O, Trail margins and woodland openings.
(wild lettuce), O, Trail margins and woodland openings.
(wood nettle), O, Rich and semi-rich forests, and enriched seeps.
(tamarack), F, Scattered in larger fen, cedar swamps, cedar seepages and adjacent mesic, conifer-rich upland forests.
(rice cut-grass), F, Pond shore marshes, less frequent in fens and swamp margins.
(duckweed), O, Fen hollows, pond shore marshes, pools in flooded cedar swamp, and vernal pool.
(ox-eye daisy) [Chrysanthemum leucanthemum], F, Hayfield, trail margins, and other disturbed areas.
(twin-flower), F, Most frequent on hummocks in cedar swamps, seepage forests, and fens, also in coniferous upland forests.
(Loesels twayblade), R, About 50 plants in larger rich fen, also historically collected from marl pond shore in 1907 and 1944., source: COLL. S2 Threatened; A. R. Hodgdon 4802 [University of New Hampshire], A. S. Pease 10756 [Harvard University]
(Indian tobacco), O, Trail margins, tip-up mounds in upland forest, and other disturbed areas.
(American fly-honeysuckle), F, Abundant in cedar swamps and cedar seepage forests, less frequently in upland forests.
(Morrows honeysuckle), R, A few clumps in openings at cedar swamp and seepage forest margins.
(common wood rush), O, Trail margins, field edges, and scattered on mounds in rich mesic forest., source: COLL.; David Edward Boufford 1971-06-14 [Keene State College]
(running clubmoss), O, Sporadic in upland forests and wetland margins often with other clubmosses.
(American water-horehound), R, Rich fens and wet thickets NE of hayfield.
(common water-horehound), F, Pond shore marshes, fens, swamp openings, mesic trails and field margins.
(starflower) [Trientalis b.], C, Upland forests, hummocks in cedar swamps and fens., source: COLL.; David Edward Boufford 2635 [Keene State College]
(fringed loosestrife), O, Noted on forested slopes above Fish Pond Road, along trail in cedar seepage forest, and in cedar swamp.
(false Solomons-seal) [Smilacina racemosa], F, Upland woods, less frequently in swamps., source: COLL.; A. S. Pease 10886 [Harvard University]
(three-leaved false Solomons-seal) [Smilacina trifolia], R, Wet hollows in cedar swamps and wooded section of larger fen - transitional to cedar swamp.
(green adders-mouth), R, A dozen or fewer plants in small blowdown gaps near main pond access trail, also two plants in a cedar swamp., source: S3 Watch List
(wild apple), O, Sparsely scattered around the hayfield, rarely in other openings.
(pineapple-weed), R, Bare gravelly patches in parking area.
(ostrich fern), O, Moist draws in rich mesic forest and swamp margins.
(Indian cucumber-root), F, Upland forests, especially less enriched sections, and less frequently in cedar swamps., source: COLL.; David Edward Boufford 2634 [Keene State College]
(alfalfa), O, Hayfield.
(sweet clover), R, A single browsed off, non-flowering plant observed at site of razed sugar shack in rich mesic forest, also in hayfield near parking area.
(American wild mint) [M. arvensis], O, Pond shore marshes and fens, often on hummocks or emergent rocks and logs in moss mats.
(swamp saxifrage) [Saxifraga p.], O, Swamps hollows and seepages.
(monkey flower), O, Pond shore marshes.
(partridge-berry), R/O, Upland forests.
(one-flowered pyrola) [Pyrola u.], O, Cedar swamps and cedar seepage forests.
(Indian pipe), F, Widespread, though sparse, in upland forests and occasional in cedar swamps.
(bog muhly), O, Pond shore marshes and fens.
(wirestem muhly), F, Trail margins and disturbed openings.
(wall-lettuce), F, A rapidly spreading, wind-dispersed invasive becoming common to dominant over an acre of rich mesic forest, sporadic elsewhere, including cedar seepage forests. Control efforts may be forthcoming.
(sweet gale), F, Pond shore marshes and sparsely in fens.
(tall white lettuce) [Prenanthes altissima], F, Upland forests, and less frequently in cedar swamps.
(common naiad), H, Known only from a 1912 Pease specimen from the pond., source: COLL.; A. S. Pease 13885 [Harvard University]
(heart-leaved twayblade) [Listera cordata], R, A single colony of 21 plants in a cedar swamp., source: S2 Threatened
(common yellow pond-lily) [Nuphar lutea ssp. variegata], R, In pond near shore., source: COLL.; C. B. Hellquist 1972-08-07 [University of Massachusetts, Amherst], A. S. Pease 10824 [Harvard University]
(whorled wood aster) [Aster acuminatus], F, Upland forests and cedar wetlands., source: COLL.; [no data available] 29744 [Harvard University]
(sundrops), R, In disturbed area at site of recently razed camp at north end of pond.
(prairie sundrops), R, Small patch along access road near dam at pond outlet, apparently persistent at least since 1963 when collected here by Hodgdon., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 12713 [University of New Hampshire]
(sensitive fern), C, Widespread in wetlands, especially those with seepage, and moist upland forests.
(one-sided pyrola) [Pyrola s.], F, Cedar swamps and seepage forests., source: COLL.; [no data available] 10493 [Harvard University]
(mountain rice-grass), O, Upland forests, especially on south aspect slopes, less frequently in disturbed cedar seepage forest., source: COLL.; G. R. Cooley 8105 [University of New Hampshire], A. S. Pease 10450 [Harvard University]
(sweet cicely), O, Rich mesic forest and semi-rich forest, trail margins and young forests., source: COLL.; G. E. Crow 2549 [University of New Hampshire], David Edward Boufford [Keene State College]
(interrupted fern), R/O?, Noted along a trail margin in typic upland forest, perhaps overlooked more widely.
(royal fern), F, Pond shore marshes, sparsely in fens and cedar swamps., source: COLL.
(hop-hornbeam), O, Upland forests, particularly in areas with enrichment and on the rocky slopes above Fish Pond Road.
(slender yellow wood-sorrel), O, Hayfield and parking area, logging trails.
(wood-sorrel), F, Cedar swamps and seepage forests, less frequently in coniferous uplands.
(Robbins ragwort) [Senecio schweinitzianus], O, Fens, pond shore marshes, and cedar swamp openings.
(New York fern) [Thelypteris n.], C, Upland forests, sporadically in cedar swamps.
(water smartweed) [Polygonum amphibium], H, Known only from 1907 Pease and Moore specimens from pond shore marshes, perhaps overlooked in the present study., source: COLL.; A. H. Moore 3837 [Harvard University], A. S. Pease 10465 [Harvard University]
(water-pepper) [Polygonum h.], R, In open marshy section of flooded cedar swamp impounded by a logging trail. Perhaps overlooked elsewhere.
(tearthumb) [Polygonum sagittatum], O, Wet trail openings through cedar seepage forest and other disturbed seepage areas.
(northern sweet colts-foot), H, Known only from a 1942 Pease specimen from 'Damp woods near Lime Pond'., source: COLL. S1 Endangered; A. S. Pease 29758 [Harvard University]
(reed canary grass), O, Moister parts of hayfield and pond shore marshes., source: COLL.; A. H. Moore 3854 [Harvard University], A. S. Pease 10447 [Harvard University]
(long beech fern), F, Cedar swamps and seepage forests, seeps, and mesic forests., source: COLL.; David Edward Boufford 2650 [Keene State College]
(hybrid beech fern), R?, Collected in 2021 from cedar swamp margin east of pond, the first extant site in NH for this recently described, and somewhat cryptic, species, likely more widespread at Preserve and in NH., source: COLL. SU Indeterminate; Matthew J. Peters 21-54c [Consortium of Northeastern Herbaria]
(timothy), C, Hayfield dominant.
(white spruce), F, Upland forest near the ponds, in cedar swamps, sparsely in big fen.
(red spruce), O, Upland forests, especially on slopes or rockier areas, perhaps also in one cedar swamp transitional to mixedwood seepage swamp., source: COLL. R.W. Rhoades 997 [LAF]
(orange hawkweed) [Hieracium aurantiacum], O, Woodland openings, trails and field margins.
(yellow king devil) [Hieracium caespitosum], O, Hayfield and parking area, logging trails, disturbed areas, openings in forests, less frequently in swamps.
(white pine), F, Upland forests and rarely in swamps.
(buckhorn plantain), R, In disturbed area at recently razed 'Moran camp' at north end of pond. Also known from a 1971 Boufford collection from 'Logging Rd. So. of Lime Pd.' Perhaps overlooked in hayfield or trails., source: COLL.; David Edward Boufford [Keene State College]
(plantain), F, Hayfield and parking area, logging trails, disturbed areas.
O, Sporadic in wetlands and moist upland woods., source: Peters 2019; A. R. Hodgdon 12684 [University of New Hampshire]
R, Needs confirmation, probable in fen., source: Peters 2019
(blunt-leaved bog-orchid) [Habenaria o.], R, Over 160 plants scattered widely in several cedar swamps., source: S3 Watch List
(round-leaved orchis) [Habenaria o.], R, Dozens in moist upland forest adjacent to larger rich fen and cedar swamps.
Poa
(woodland bluegrass), F, Trails and disturbed sites.
(annual bluegrass), F, Parking area, trails and disturbed sites.
(Canada bluegrass), R, Near pond shore in disturbed area at recently razed 'Moran camp' at north end of pond. Also known from a 1907 Pease specimen from 'around Lime Pond', originally determined as P. pratensis and recently annotated to this species., source: COLL.; A. S. Pease 10,441 [Harvard University]
(fowl meadow grass), F, Pond shore marshes, fens, moist disturbed areas.
(common two-rayed poa), R, Single small colony of plants in moist, disturbed upland forest adjacent a cedar swamp west of pond.
(rough bluegrass), R?, Seepy hollows of large fen, likely also other seepage wetland areas, easily overlooked.
(low knotweed), R, Bare gravelly patches in parking area.
(rock polypody), R, On small bedrock outcrops and boulders on steep slopes east and west of pond outlet stream.
(Christmas fern), C, Upland forests.
(balsam poplar), F, Younger or disturbed forests, especially mesic areas and seepage forests, sparsely in fens., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 4843 [University of New Hampshire], A. H. Moore 3836 [Harvard University], A. S. Pease 13983 [Harvard University]
(large-toothed aspen), F, Upland forests and occasionally in swamps.
(quaking aspen), F, Upland forests. Among the earliest documented species from the Lime Pond area, first collected in 1855 by William Boott, though stating 'Lime Pond,' the specimen is attributed to Colebrook, NH, perhaps erroneously., source: COLL.; A. H. Moore 3631 [Harvard University], W. Boott 1855-09-16 [Harvard University], A. S. Pease 11082 [Harvard University]
(alpine pondweed), R, A small colony of vegetative plants noted in flooded marshy section of former cedar swamp impounded by logging trail. Should be sought in the pond as well., source: COLL. S1 Endangered; Matthew J. Peters 21-90c [Consortium of Northeastern Herbaria]
(broad-leaved pondweed), H?, Pond, Known from a 1912 Pease specimen and others more recently, probable fragments collected by Sperduto in 2007, likely still present., source: COLL.; G. E. Crow... 1980-06-30 [University of Massachusetts, Amherst], [no data available] 13883 [Harvard University], [no data available] 13883 [Harvard University], [no data available] 13883 [Harvard University]
(leafy pondweed), R, A small colony of plants noted in a flooded marshy section of former cedar swamp impounded by logging trail. Should be sought in the pond as well as it is known from nearby Fish Pond., source: COLL. SH Endangered; Matthew J. Peters 21-90d [Consortium of Northeastern Herbaria]
(silvery cinquefoil), R, Parking area.
(Canada cinquefoil), O, Trail margins and field edges, hayfield, disturbed openings. P. simplex may perhaps also be present and overlooked due to similarity.
(rough cinquefoil), O, Hayfield and parking area, logging trails, disturbed areas (native ssp. monspeliensis)
(sulphur cinquefoil), R, Hayfield.
(self-heal), F, Hayfield, disturbed areas, and sparsely in cedar wetlands and seepages.
(fire cherry), F, Younger forest areas and logging openings, scarce or only present as fallen trees in older stands.
(black cherry), F, Upland forests, especially in younger forest areas.
(choke cherry), F, Field and trail margins, disturbed openings in upland forests, and young forest adjacent the NE corner of hayfield.
(bracken), F, In disturbed or gappy upland forests and along trails and edges, often in areas with less enrichment.
(shinleaf), C, Upland forests, less frequently in cedar wetlands, abundant in young forest adjacent the NE corner of hayfield., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 12716 [University of New Hampshire]
(kidney-leaved crowfoot), O, Rich mesic forest, often at tree bases and on mounds with some bare soil., source: COLL.; David Edward Boufford 1971-06-14 [Keene State College]
(common buttercup), F, Hayfield, trails, rarely in seepage wetlands.
(white water-crowfoot), H, Known only from 1980 Crow and Hellquist specimens originally determined as var. calvescens, later annotated to var. diffusus (though unannotated duplicates exist)., source: COLL. G.E. Crow, C.E. & C.B. Hellquist 14462 [SDC]; G. E. Crow 3057A [University of New Hampshire], C. B. Hellquist... 1980-06-30 [University of Massachusetts, Amherst]
(hooked crowfoot), F, Mesic upland woods, seeps, and seepage areas of swamps., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 12695 [University of New Hampshire], David Edward Boufford 1971-06-14 [Keene State College]
(yellow-rattle), F, Hayfield, especially drier areas near access road., source: COLL.; G. E. Crow 2552 [University of New Hampshire]
(staghorn sumac), R, Disturbed upland openings.
(wild black currant), O, Fens and swamp openings.
(dog gooseberry), O, Upland forests, especially rocky areas with some enrichment.
(skunk currant), O, Margins of cedar seepage forests.
(swamp red currant), R/O, Cedar swamps.
(bristly rose), R, Pond shore. Currently extant with Peters' specimen confirmed by A. Gilman. 1907 collections by Pease and Moore were originally determined as this species, but Pease himself revised to R. palustris in his 1964 flora (but did not annotate the specimen, though Ahles later did so agreeing on R. palustris). Moore's specimen remains unaltered from the original determination, and all warrant reexamination by a specialist., source: COLL.; Matthew J. Peters 21-92b [Consortium of Northeastern Herbaria], A. H. Moore 3859 [Harvard University]
This specimen not annotated, but corresponding Pease specimen from same day/place annotated to R. palustris as Pease himself revised it in his flora.; A. S. Pease 10458 [Harvard University]
(common highbush blackberry), F, Widespread, most abundant in old logging openings.
(elegant blackberry) [subsumed in R. canadensis], H, Known only from 1963 Hodgdon and Rhoades collections from 'Along road to Lime Pond'. Likely still present and overlooked. Often synonymized with the previous species., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 15565 [University of New Hampshire], A. R. Hodgdon 15565 [University of New Hampshire]
(red raspberry), F, Disturbed openings and logging gaps, field and trail margins, and small fen.
(black-eyed Susan), O, Hayfield and trail margins.
(sheep sorrel), F, Hayfield, disturbed areas.
(bitter dock), O, Moist disturbed areas and wetland margins.
(common pearlwort), O, Parking area and disturbed soils.
(common arrowhead), O, Pond shore marshes, especially cattail marsh at north end, and sparsely along channel in outlet stream fen.
(Bebbs willow), F, Wetland openings, trail and field margins and other disturbed areas.
(pussy willow), F, Wetland openings, including fens, wet trail margins, especially robust in disturbed seepage forest adjacent the NE corner of hayfield., source: COLL.; A. S. Pease 13981 [Harvard University]
(wand willow), O, Wetland openings, usually along wet trails and moist field edges., source: COLL.; A. S. Pease 13982 [Harvard University]
(shining willow), R, Rich fens, openings in cedar swamps and seepage forests., source: COLL.; M. L. Fernald... 16815 [Harvard University]
(meadow willow), R, Noted once in larger rich fen.
(balsam willow), R, Scattered in larger rich fen.
(red-berried elder), O, Upland forests, less frequently in cedar swamps.
(snakeroot), R, A few vegetative plants in cedar swamp in NW section of Preserve, likely S. marilandica, but warrants confirmation.
(meadow fescue) [Festuca p.], O, Hayfield.
(hard-stemmed bulrush) [Scirpus a.], H, Known only from 1917 Pease and Fernald specimen and 1948 Krochmal specimen, both from the pond., source: COLL.; M. L. Fernald... 16718 [Harvard University]
(dark bulrush), ?, Reported by Ward from marsh at north end of pond, possibly attributable to the following species.
(Hattori bulrush), F, Moist trails and other disturbed areas.
(barberpole bulrush), O, Pond shore marshes and fens, and disturbed opening in cedar seepage forest north of pond., source: COLL. G.E. Crow, C.E. & C. B. Hellquist 14462 [CM]
(pedicellate bulrush), R, Scattered along pond shore marshes and a disturbed wet trail opening in cedar seepage forest.
(fall dandelion) [Leontodon a.], O, Hayfield and disturbed openings.
(marsh skullcap), F, Pond shore marshes, fens, less frequently in cedar swamp and seepage forest openings., source: COLL.; A. S. Pease 10468 [University of New Hampshire], A. R. Hodgdon 12747 [University of New Hampshire]
(blue skullcap), F, Pond shore marshes, seeps, less frequently in cedar swamp and seepage forest openings.
(common white campion) [Lychnis alba], R, Hayfield margin.
(common bladder campion) [Silene cucubalus], O, Hayfield and parking area.
(common blue-eyed grass), R, In disturbed area at recently razed 'Moran camp' at north end of pond. Also known from 2 specimens: 1944 Hodgdon & Clapp from marl pond shore (originally misidentified as S. angustifolium), with marl visible in roots, and 1978 Crow & others from an 'open meadow along seepage'., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 4803 [University of New Hampshire], G. E. Crow 2553 [University of New Hampshire]
(bittersweet nightshade), O, Swamps and areas of seepage or moist soil.
(Canada goldenrod), F, Field edges, openings, and less frequently in disturbed wetland areas.
(zig-zag goldenrod), O, Rich and semi-rich forest areas, scattered in other upland forests.
(large goldenrod), F, Field edges, trail margins, and wetland openings.
(large-leaved goldenrod), R, Upland forests.
(gray goldenrod), R, Drier area of hayfield along access road and in disturbed areas at razed camp north of pond.
(rough-leaved goldenrod), F, Field and trail edges, sparsely in wetland and woodland openings.
(bog goldenrod), R, Larger rich fen.
(sow thistle), H, Known only from a 1942 Pease specimen from 'shore of Lime Pond' with marl visible in roots., source: COLL.; A. S. Pease 29,756 [Harvard University]
(American mountain ash), O, Swamps and upland forests, typically in more coniferous areas adjacent wetlands, small saplings more common than mature trees.
(narrow-leaved bur-reed), H, Known only from a 1912 Pease specimen that notes 'Abundant in Lime Pond'. Today very little floating-leaved aquatic plant growth is evident in the pond., source: COLL.; [no data available] 13884 [Harvard University]
(green bur-reed), R, In open marshy section of flooded cedar swamp impounded by logging trail, perhaps overlooked in pond shore marshes or wet fen hollows.
(red sand spurrey), R, Bare gravelly patches in parking area.
(slender wedge grass), R/O, Fen along outlet stream, pond shore, likely scattered elsewhere in uplands and wetlands., source: COLL.; A. H. Moore 3864 [Harvard University], A. S. Pease 10446 [Harvard University]
(stiff clubmoss) [Lycopodium a.], F, Upland forests.
(meadowsweet), F, Pond shore, fens, field edges.
(steeplebush), O, Pond shore, fens, field edges.
(alpine stitchwort), O, Seeps and seepage areas in cedar swamps and fens.
(common stitchwort), R/O, Hayfield, perhaps more common than noted.
(rosy twisted-stalk) [S. roseus], O, Upland forests., source: COLL.
(heart-leaved aster) [Aster cordifolius], O, Field edges, trail margins, openings, and other disturbed sites, less frequently in upland forests.
(lance-leaved aster) [Aster lanceolatus], O, Pond shore marshes and fens, perhaps moist field areas.
(calico aster) [Aster lateriflorus], O, Trail margins in cedar seepage forest, likely overlooked elsewhere.
(red-stemmed aster) [Aster puniceus], F, Fens, pond shore, and cedar swamp openings.
(common dandelion), C, Hayfield, disturbed areas, and sporadic elsewhere.
(Canada yew), O, Upland forests and cedar swamps, often browsed by deer and more robust in areas protected from them.
(tall meadow-rue), R, Noted near pond shore adjacent to disturbed area at site of recently razed camp at north end of pond, perhaps overlooked elsewhere.
(marsh fern), O, Pond shore marshes, fens, and less frequently in cedar swamps and seepage forests.
(northern white cedar), C, Dominant in cedar swamps and seepage forests, abundant in larger fen, occasional in upland forests, especially adjacent to wetlands., source: COLL.; G. E. Crow 2554 [University of New Hampshire], S. B. Krochmal 1592 [University of New Hampshire], D. E. Boufford 1971-06-14 [University of Massachusetts, Amherst], David Edward Boufford 2647 [Keene State College]
(basswood), O, Rich mesic forest.
(northern manna grass), R?, In mucky hollows and shallow water in pond shore marshes, fens, and cedar swamps, perhaps somewhat overlooked.
(Frasers marsh St. Johns-wort), O, Pond shore marshes and fens.
(marsh St. Johns-wort), H, Known only from a 1963 collection by Hodgdon and Rhoades from 'moist tree stumps on shore of Lime Pond'. Specimen appears immature and should be verified, as only T. fraseri observed in this study., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 12709 [University of New Hampshire]
(alpine cotton-grass) [Scirpus hudsonianus], H, Known only from 1907 Pease and Moore specimens from the east pond shore., source: COLL. A.H. Moore 3868 [MICH]; A.S. Pease 10438 [MICH & USF]
(large hop clover), R/O, Hayfield and parking area.
(red clover), C, Hayfield, trail margins.
(white clover), C, Hayfield, trail margins.
(red trillium), F, Upland forests.
(painted trillium), O, Coniferous forest areas and rarely in cedar swamps.
(eastern hemlock), F, Dominant in a few small stands on south aspects, sparse elsewhere.
(colts-foot), F, Cedar seepage forests, seeps, and moist draws in rich mesic forest, especially in areas with more recent disturbance.
(broad-leaved cat-tail), C, Cattail marsh, pond shore marshes, rich fens, disturbed openings in cedar swamps, locally dominant in some areas, perhaps increasing.
(northern bladderwort), R?, Known from 1907 and 1917 Pease, Moore, and Fernald specimens from the pond shore and 2007 Sperduto specimen from fen on outlet stream., source: COLL.; A. H. Moore 3857 [Harvard University], M. L. Fernald... 16824 [Harvard University], A. S. Pease 10867 [Harvard University]
(common bladderwort) [U. macrorhiza], O, In permanently saturated to shallowly pooled hollows of larger rich fen, possibly also in the pond.
(wild-oats), F, Upland forests.
(cranberry), R, In margin of larger rich fen.
(velvet-leaved blueberry), O, Hummocks in swamps and fens, and less often in upland forests.
(garden heliotrope), F, Disturbed openings and trails in cedar seepage forests, especially north of the pond.
(Indian poke), O, Cedar swamps and seepage forests.
(blue vervain), R, In wet trail through cedar seepage forest north of pond.
(American brooklime), O, Pond shore marshes, fens, seeps, and cedar swamps, often along seepage runs or small channels., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 12734 [University of New Hampshire]
(common speedwell), F, Young upland forest, along trails, less frequently in cedar swamps., source: COLL.; A. S. Pease 29,750 [Harvard University]
(thyme-leaved speedwell), O, Hayfield and parking area, logging trails, disturbed areas., source: COLL.
(hobble-bush) [V. alnifolium], F, Mesic upland woods, less often in cedar swamps.
(wild raisin) [V. cassinoides], O, Cedar swamps and larger rich fen, perhaps overlooked elsewhere.
(highbush cranberry) [V. trilobum, V.o. var. americanum], R, Wet thickets adjacent the NE corner of hayfield.
(cow vetch), O, Hayfield.
(Canada violet), O, Rich mesic forest including former sugarbush., source: COLL. S3 Watch List; G. E. Crow 2551 [University of New Hampshire], M. L. Fernald... 16586 [Harvard University]
(marsh blue violet), F, Seeps and seepage areas within various wetlands., source: COLL.; David Edward Boufford 2658 [Keene State College]
(northern white violet), F, Trails, seeps, and swamp margins.
(smooth yellow violet), F, Upland forests, especially in rich and semi-rich areas., source: COLL.; G. E. Crow 2541 [University of New Hampshire]
(kidney-leaved violet), F, Upland forests, especially in rich and semi-rich areas, less frequently in cedar swamps., source: COLL.; A. R. Hodgdon 12711 [University of New Hampshire], David Edward Boufford 1971-06-14 [Keene State College]
(early yellow violet), O, Upland forests, especially in rich and semi-rich areas, often along skid tracks and on tip up mounds.
(great-spurred violet), O, Rich mesic forest, perhaps more widely scattered.
(dooryard violet) [subsumed in V. sororia], O, Road margins and trails, especially in young forest adjacent the NE corner of hayfield. Sometimes lumped with V. sororia., source: COLL.; S. B. Krochmal 1593 [University of New Hampshire], Matthew J. Peters 21-90e [Consortium of Northeastern Herbaria]
(rusty woodsia), R, A few plants on an outcrop on south slopes above Fish Pond Road.
(golden Alexanders), R, Moist disturbed woods adjacent the NE corner of hayfield.
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